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NEXT Project Presents an Intimate Family Portrait

Category: Main Blog

Noelle Smith, Photojournalism, BFA ’15, remembered the night she pulled into the Annapolis gas station where her friend Zeus worked. Just days into her senior year, Noelle was contemplating the subject for her thesis project. Broaching the topic in casual conversation, Zeus proposed an idea.

The luminaries here are not the painters but the subjects of this wide-ranging portraiture show that opened February 24th. From the outsider art of Clark V. Fox and the cheek-to-cheek insider art of Warhol and Botero

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“What’s the point of not collaborating? The possibilities–what could happen–let’s not wait for a policy, let’s just find peers and work with them.”

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The scene is set. Shaky camera footage captures two unidentified men standing on top of a truck and detaching an enormous helium balloon that spells out “Banksy!”

Robert Longo, Empire,
1981, Still/Performance, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

The concept is based on the idea that topography is the evidence of change over time, which parallels the Corcoran’s creative heritage and dynamic future.

From his home in Washington, D.C., Corcoran alumnus Sam Corum, Photography BFA ’12, watched images of the turmoil unfolding in Ferguson, Mo., flash across his TV screen. Corum packed his cameras and hopped in his car.

how to survive your own death (28), archival inkjet print mounted and waxed on dibond, 35" x 43.5", 2004, ed. 3/5

Recently, photographer and former Corcoran professor Colby Caldwell emailed in response to our rundown of alum Jason Gubiotti’s show, War Paint. Included was a gem.

Unveiled is excited to host our first guest post from the National Gallery of Art on the newly conserved “Knife Edge Mirror Two Piece.”

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Not nothing as in nothing substantial, or as is nothingness/nirvana, or the great void–but in the space occupied by nothing.

Nicole Gunning, "when the artist hits the fan"

Courses set, readjusted and re-set again. As Gallery 31’s Pilot finished installing, we spoke with Eliot Hicks and Ashley Van Gemeren on the impetuses that got their works to where they are.